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13 – Where Have All The Glass Children Gone?

Where Have All The Glass Children Gone?

In episode 13, Laura and Anna embark on a new journey to tell untold tales of resilience. During a chat with Laura’s mum, they learn some of ways in which family life can be different and the impact that had on Maree’s willingness to do things like drive herself home from hospital with one hand. They decide that there really is no handbook for life and that bringing babies into the world is a really damn hard job. Go mums!

12 – I Believe I Can Die

I Believe I Can Die

In episode 12, Anna finds it hard to process good news about her retirement and an invitational FKJ rant from a seasoned listener rocks her mismatched socks off. Laura’s Dad makes his podcast debut and provides meaningful and practical insight into why it’s important to write a will. With helpful reminders to get yourself a sea gull, make yourself a quill, write a rich fancy person will and DON’T SET THE TURTLES ON FIRE, you too will be excited to plan your Viking glitter sled into space burial. Whether you want to be whole or ashes, just let someone know, mmkay!

11 – A Dollar Is All I Need

A Dollar Is All I Need

In episode 11, Laura and Anna doth not take heed of their own advice and both their cards decline during the week. Anna is rich on Wednesday, poor on Thursday and hopes that she shall never run out of toilet paper again. She reminds us not to go hard and fast if you can’t sustain it, wisdom on many levels, and Laura demands that you make your money date and create new dreams out of old dreams that are better dreams. The biggest rant on pockets of all time reminds us of the saddest indictment of modern fashion and Anna says OWN YOUR SHOWER ROUTINE.

10 – If I Was A Rich Girl

If I Was A Rich Girl

Anna walks the walk cat walking and likens her current situation to a beautiful, melancholic analogy involving ropes and lifeboats and drowning. Laura and Anna face retirement with fixed feelings of excitement and dread, because although retirement is gobbledygook and saving is other peoples business, they still want you to build your life raft and be your future you!

9 – Got 99 Problems But Rich Aint One

Got 99 Problems But Rich Ain’t One

TRIGGER WARNING FOR SENSITIVE CONTENT. Laura and Anna reminisce on poor sad people things aka toblerone dinners and rich happy people things aka chest freezers. Getting hit with the hard truth about credit cards and having personal revelations in real-time, this one’s a humdinger! Anna demands that you take your shoulder pads and go be successful at life, reminding us that IT’S NOT LINEAR, LAURA. GOSH.

8 – Spend The Pain Away

Spend The Pain Away

In the second episode on pretty mental money problems, Laura and Anna begin with their usual killjoy rant, this time on Ninja Turtles being named after limbless statues and a request to men to move to the back when it comes to #metoo. Remembering the not-so-better days of expensive Doona covers and making homes in sheds with fancy rich lady matchboxes, we urge you to take on the financial tidal wave, fight that shit and save yo’self. Yas Queens!

7 – Let’s Talk About Money

Let’s Talk About Money

In the first episode of season 2, Laura returns from a holiday, Anna from a breakdown of sorts and Fort Dynamite has had a makeover. A quality feminist rant on workplace gender equality ensues before revelations about spending fat stacks of cash on food and top opp shop purchases. After discussion on the security aspects of wanting to be rich people that reuse their tea bags, we conclude that money causes a constant state of insecurity that we will spend the rest of the season trying to conquer!

Listener Feedback Vol. 1

Listener Feedback Vol. 1

Bonus Episode!

Some of our listeners have told us some nice things that we wanted to share before we launch into Season 2: Pretty Mental Money Problems. Includes flaming bodies falling from buildings, tired angry Anna cupcakes, connecting with muggles, awkie’s high fives and phantom pregnancies. We also review Winchester and the sad glass mystery continues. Thank you, thank you, thank you to all of our listeners for being a part of our fort of feels and please keep telling us your stories!

6 – Would You Like Cries With That?

In the final episode of season 1, Laura is haunted by Tim Tam dreams and Anna is feeling 80% normal although it didn’t stop her from nailing a mystery door shut and trapping someone in an office. Discussion takes a twist to filming on poo farms but is generally about the hangry hell on wheels that periods can bring into our lives. We haven’t really figured out this topic yet and are hoping for some audience feedback on what it is that makes periods so damn disruptive and frustrating. Special episode on Listener Feedback Vol. 1 out next week!

A terminal trip around the sun

In the chaotic nature of an ever-changing world, the last six months of my life has been pockmarked by many things, but most significantly by the death of three people. Three pins pulled out of the map of my life, leaving behind little black holes, swirling precariously like an obstacle course on the road to my future. The edges of which nip at my heels as I pass by and I have to avoid getting caught and pulled into the darkness.

These are the kinds of phenomena that make me feel like my life has come to a sudden stop and give me vertigo at the halt. They make me feel motion sickness as the world spins too quickly and I desperately try to pull the pace of everyone else’s existence back to my own. I want everyone to put their lives on hold and wait for me to catch up. I’m not ready to move on. I’m not ready for past tense.

They made me think a lot about the fragility of everything around me. Not in the way that anxiety usually has me fretting with the ever persistent feeling that something bad is going to happen at any given moment. But in a way that has me feeling curious about how much more my life has yet to evolve.

One day sooner than I want to think about, my grandparents won’t be around anymore, and the childhood memories I cherish of them will be just that, memories. There will come a time in my life that I won’t be able to turn to my parents and ask them for advice, and will have to relish every piece that they have given to me already.

I might lose a partner or child, a sibling or friend, and I will have to make space to deal with that loss. I will have to face these tragedies with unwilling compassion and understanding. I will have to acknowledge that I can’t control everything.

I will be reminded that there are only certain things I can control, like the way we behave in the here and now. It seems that we never say the things we need to while people are alive. We forget to tell people how much we love and admire and appreciate them, that we value them and they are important to us. We get too busy to make a phone call. Sometimes we’re embarrassed to say so, ashamed of our true feelings.

I think we are also so afraid of death that we can’t accept we need to say these things now, lest they force us to accept that one day we might not have the chance.

Last year I saw my Dad cry for the first time I remember and struggle to tell my brothers and I how proud he was of us. I watched him hurt for the loss of a child and the pain he tried to hold for his wife. I watched my family bottom out and I learned more about my step-sister at her funeral than I ever got to learn in the 21 years that I knew her.

I learned true pain in that experience, but I also watched my family come together and show their love and support, sharing their raw and honest emotions about their loss. I have never felt more connected to them and I am grateful for this but I don’t want to leaves things so unsaid anymore. I want to make time, I want to prioritise love over work and ambitions and moments that aren’t now.

Retrospect is always a bittersweet slice of pie but we can use it to shape the rest of our lives, to make more of an effort to voice our feelings and strengthen our connections while we are still present in this piece of time and space. Sometimes we are not afforded the opportunity to say goodbye, and in that place we have to remember to tell people what they mean to us while we can.

Anxiety and depression tell me that bad things are going to happen and thus there is no point in doing anything good. That I am an intrinsically bad person. That I am worthless and pointless and so buried in the enormity of the universe that nothing I do will matter anyway. But through the raw and painful feelings of grief, I have come to understand that no matter how short or fragile or seemingly pointless life seems sometimes, it is still worthy to appreciate the things that matter to us, no matter who or what they are.

All we have is the here and now, and we have to live in this space because we have no surety in anything else.

Every day, every week, every month, every year, pushes us down different a path. Time forces our hand and makes us face decisions we never thought we would. We can never trick ourselves into thinking, this is it, this is my life now, because we will never know the course that our life will end up taking.

Some people will call this fate but it is just the result of millions of people existing together, with every person in every second causing a butterfly effect on one another.

There isn’t much to be done when people we love leave life as we know it, except try to wear their lives like badges of experience. We can take on the lessons they would have wanted us to learn and give them a little place in our own lives, to foster the values they held the closest and live our lives a little better than before.

Life is complex and dark and beautifully tragic. Every second is a loss of one thing, but it is also the birth of something else. We are all on a terminal trail around the sun and we can do nothing more than grasp every moment we have and make the most of it.

Laura